Top Uses Of A HELOC

Top Uses Of A HELOCHomeowners who have equity built up in their homes can tap into that equity using a home equity line of credit, or HELOC. This financial tool can be a great way to accomplish a number of financial goals.

Here are four excellent uses of a HELOC for homeowners to consider.

Consolidating Costly Debts

Credit card debt and other types of consumer loans are costly, unless a debtor is lucky enough to have a no-interest card. Borrowers can consolidate that debt into a HELOC, which is much more affordable because it is a secured debt.

This advantage only works if the borrower stops adding to the debt problem. A HELOC becomes a valuable tool to get rid of debt quickly when used properly.

Create An Emergency Fund

Most people do not intend to end up in credit trouble, but emergencies happen. Emergency home repairs, job loss, or car repairs can quickly add up to unwanted debt.

A HELOC provides homeowners the option to have an emergency fund. Should one of these emergencies pop up, the homeowner can use the HELOC for an affordable source of funds.

Home Repairs That Add Value

Some home repairs add value to the property, but are also expensive. A HELOC can provide a source to fund these repairs. Because they put value back into the property, homeowners may be making wise use of their equity when using the HELOC in this way.

To make this work well, homeowners should choose repairs that do add to the home’s value. Since the cost of the repairs comes from the equity, the home’s owner should recoup the costs later when selling the home.

Funds For Investing

Finally, homeowners can use funds from a HELOC to get started in investment. This is risky, because the loan is paid regardless of how successful the investment is, but it can give a homeowner the chance to start investing for the first time.

Similarly, retirees can sometimes use HELOC funds to supplement retirement income if investments are struggling. This is a temporary solution to give investments a chance to recover, but for those living on a fixed income it is very helpful to have this option.

The HELOC is a valuable tool for homeowners that allows them to tap equity when it is needed. Since they have spent years building up this equity, homeowners should not fear using it when it can help with their financial goals.

Contact your trusted loan professional to find out if a HELOC may be right for you. 

5 Key Factors That Affect Your Mortgage Rate

5 Key Factors That Affect Your Mortgage RateMany first time home buyers often wonder what factors determine their mortgage rate. Is it their credit score? Is it the type of loan chosen? Is it the size of the loan?

The truth is, there are many factors at play. Mortgage interest rates are not standardized across the board, so they vary from lender to lender and from borrower to borrower.

Here are 5 common factors that determine or affect your mortgage interest rate:

1.    Default Risk

Risk is a key consideration when determining mortgage interest rates. Banks and other lenders are in a risky business because there is always a chance of a borrower defaulting on their loan repayments. This is known as default risk. 

Banks and lenders therefore charge riskier borrowers higher interest rates to discourage them from borrowing, as well as to be able to average their returns between risky and non-risky borrowers. Risk is one of the prime factors that influence your mortgage rate.

2.    Credit Score

Perhaps you are wondering how banks and other lenders determine if you are a risky or non-risky borrower. There are many tools they can use, but your credit score plays a big role. You credit score is based on the borrowing history in your credit report, which summarizes all details about your credit card balances and timely bill repayment. 

If you pay your bills on time and sustain relatively low credit scores, your credit score stays high and lenders view you as a low-risk borrower. Consequently, your mortgage interest rates tend to be lower than a person with a low credit score.

3.    Type of Property You Are Purchasing

Some properties have a higher risk of default compared to others. This is determined by analyzing the historical likelihood of default on different properties; lenders use this analysis as the reason to charge higher mortgage interest rates on riskier ones. 

For example, vacation homes tend to have a higher rate of default compared to single-family homes and lenders charge higher rates for such homes. 

4.    Size of Down Payment

The amount of money you pay upfront on the mortgage also influences its interest rate. A large down payment gives you a lower LTV ratio (loan-to-value), which also decreases the level of risk borne by a lender. A small down payment, on the other hand, gives you a high LTV ratio and thus a higher mortgage interest rate.

5.    Loan Amount

A large loan bears a higher risk than a smaller one simply because there is more money at risk. Most lenders therefore charge higher interest rates on large property loans as compared to smaller ones.

All in all, different lenders offer different rates depending on their style of operation, appetite for risk, or competitiveness in the market. It’s important to search intensively for offers from different lenders for the best mortgage rate. Contact your mortgage professional to help you find out more about mortgage rates and what that means for your next home purchase.

 

The Magic Number: Does Your Credit Score Need To Be Above 800 To Apply For A Mortgage?

The Magic Number: Does Your Credit Score Need to Be Above 800 to Apply for a Mortgage?Over the course of a lifetime, financial development can lead to some wonderful opportunities. A person’s financial development and state of affairs is something that is particularly important when it comes to taking out a bank loan to further progress in life, and the largest loan most people will require is a mortgage for a home purchase.

Since the process of getting approved for a mortgage is heavily dependent on credit history and that three-digit credit score that reflects reliability as a borrower, you should always put forth practices to keep that number healthy and growing.

However, how much importance does a credit score hold? Does that magic, three-digit number need to be above 800 in order to get approved for a mortgage?

The FICO Score: The Magic Number That Counts

When you apply for a mortgage, you will have to provide certain information to your financial institution or mortgage broker. The mortgage specialist at your bank or mortgage broker will then pull your credit score and your credit report.

Fair, Isaac and Company is the scorekeeper of your FICO score, which ranges from 300 to 850, 850 being the highest of all scores, and 300 being the lowest.

Every person in the United States has three FICO scores from the three different credit-reporting bureaus. Up to 80 percent of financial lenders will use a borrower’s FICO score in order to approve a mortgage application and determine a suitable interest rate on the loan.

The 600 Range: Fair And Good Credit Mortgage Options

If your credit score isn’t perfect (ie. above the 800 mark), you need not worry too much. There are many options available for those with credit scores around 600, and, with many different financial lenders to consider, having a mortgage approved sometimes means persisting with an application to several different lenders before receiving a “yes.”

With a “fair” and “good” credit rating falling between 620 and 719, there are options available to get approved for a mortgage well under the perfect 800 mark.  An FHA loan is a type of mortgage loan that is insured by the US Federal Housing Administration, offering an option with more flexible qualification measures. For homebuyers with a credit score above 620, this is a viable and common option.

720 To Perfect: Under 800 And Still In Great Shape

The median credit score in the United States is 723, and anything above 720 is placed with the marker of “excellent credit.” Therefore, just because you may range just slightly above 720, which may feel miles away from a perfect 800, you’re likely in just as good of shape when it comes to getting approved for a mortgage. You can expect a mortgage approval with good interest rates if you have a credit score higher than 720.

Keeping an eye on your credit rating and understanding the measures that are used in determining your credit score will certainly help you maintain a good score. Of course, speaking with a professional and receiving expert advice is always recommended. For specified information on your particular situation, contact your mortgage professional to discuss your options for receiving a mortgage loan.