Want To Buy A Home? Here’s How You Can Save Your Own Down Payment

Want To Buy A Home? Here's How You Can Save Your Own Down PaymentBurdensome student loan debt and a penchant for purchasing new electronics by 20- and 30-somethings can make saving up for a down payment on a home seem impossible. But Millennials and other potential home buyers may be surprised to discover that previous generations had money-saving challenges of their own.

Consider for a moment that many of our valued elders did not have the level of opportunity to attend college and earn a high-paying job. Look further back and you may realize that the Greatest Generation suffered through the Great Depression only to fight World War II.

Somehow, these outstanding Americans found a way to save money and become homeowners. So can you. By employing these money management techniques, you can cull together a down payment and still enjoy the latest gizmo.

Do The Math On Savings

It doesn’t make a great deal of sense to mindlessly squirrel money away without a comprehensive savings plan.

First steps should include discussing your pre-approval limit with a mortgage professional. By knowing your mortgage threshold, you will be able to work backwards and calculate a down payment amount.

One tried-and-true savings approach remains the 20-30-50 financial disbursement method. Structure your spending so that 20 percent of your earnings are going directly into debt reduction or savings. Approximately 30 percent should cover rent and the other 50 percent can be allotted for incidentals.

Make certain the 20 percent consistently finds its mark each month. Once you have cleared out the debt and are going full-bore on saving for a down payment, it can be motivating to watch your goal become a reality.

Eliminate High-Interest Debt

According to reports, the average American carried upwards of $6,375 in credit card debt during 2017. Folks, that is simply too much to effectively save money for a home down payment.

The high interest rates everyday people incur from credit card debt remains a significant impediment to saving money. If you have several cards with high balances, there is no quick fix to this problem. It will fall on you to be disciplined and methodical about paying them off.

Start with the card that charges the highest interest rate and work diligently to eliminate its balance entirely. Once you clear out the worst interest-rate offender, move on to the second worst. As these debts fall, you will have an opening to shuffle funds into your down payment savings account. We call that winning.

Pick Up Part-Time Gigs

The down payment effort can be accelerated by creating an additional revenue stream.

A few years back, the idea of the “gig economy” was trending. Stringing together a series of short-term and part-time jobs was considered cool. Although the so-called gig economy may have been the byproduct of a business sluggishness, such is no longer the case.

These days, unemployment is at record lows and employers are chomping at the bit to hire people. Consider picking up a few hours each week doing something you enjoy. It could entail anything from bartending to working as a coffee house barista. Make it fun and make certain the money goes only toward your home down payment. Talk about a win-win.

With strategic financial planning, people of all walks of life can earn the American homeownership dream. It’s time to stop thinking about the generational obstacles. Adapt, overcome and make it happen.

Your trusted mortgage professional is just the expert you need to guide you through all of your home financing options.

Do I Need 20% Down to Purchase a Home?

Should You Put 20 Percent Down On Your Home Purchase?Several generations ago, lenders required home buyers to have a 20 percent down payment in order to get a mortgage. While there were a few options out there for people who couldn’t save this substantial amount, the reality was that for the majority of people, the 20 percent down was a requirement.

It was the way to show that you were financially responsible enough for home ownership. And it was a strong way that the banks felt secure in making a home loan.

Today, however, home buyers have many options available to them as they shop for a new home, and those mortgage options mean that the 20 percent down payment is no longer as much of a requirement. For most buyers, especially those who do not have the equity of an existing home to help with their purchase, the 20 percent down payment is not even a possibility.

Yet for those who can do so, putting 20 percent down carries some benefits worth considering. Here is a closer look at when the large down payment makes sense, and what the potential drawbacks are that buyers should consider.

How The 20 Percent Down Payment Helps

When it is possible for the buyer to save enough, the 20 percent down payment does have some benefits that are worth considering. First, when you are able to save 20 percent, you can get a mortgage that has no private mortgage insurance or similar fees. Because lenders consider a borrower with less than 20 percent for the down payment to be higher risk, they charge additional fees to serve as insurance on these loans.

Putting 20 percent down also means you are borrowing less. Because every dollar you borrow will be charged interest, the less you borrow the lower your repayment costs should be over the life of the loan. This could improve your monthly cash flow as well. If you have the ability to save 20 percent, this is a benefit worth considering.

The Drawbacks Of 20 Percent Down

While saving 20 percent does have some benefits, it also has drawbacks that you must also consider. First, 20 percent of a home loan is a significant amount of money. On a $200,000 house, that means you have to save $40,000. For the average home buyer, this represents years of saving. And you could be giving up years of price appreciation in addition to the money you have lost by paying rent. In our current low-yet rising- interest rate environment you could be setting yourself up for a higher cost of ownership as well.

If you are putting all of that money down as your down payment, you may find yourself cash strapped for other home buying costs, like new furniture, repairs or closing costs on your mortgage. The Consumer Financial Protection Bureau warns that this can be a significant downside, especially for first-time buyers who have a lot of expenses as they make the move into their first homes.

For most of us it is critical to set aside money for savings, pay off high interest rate debt, and to save for retirement and other future planning/savings vehicles. Many people find themselves digging into their other investments, like their 401(k), to come up with the money for the down payment. Borrowing funds from a 401K can sometimes be useful, but withdrawing funds prematurely can be detrimental to one’s future. Paying a bit more in interest over the life of a mortgage is often better than creating a serious financial bind for your future needs.

 

Finally, saving 20 percent often means you can’t buy a home quite as quickly. Since home prices historically tend to rise, not fall, the longer you wait, the more you may spend on your home. If home prices rise by 5 percent a year, which is fairly standard, waiting two years to purchase the home means $20,000 in extra costs for a $200,000 home. The higher purchase price counters any savings you may have when you put down 20 percent.

Can You Buy With Less Than 20 Percent Down?

So can you buy a home with less than 20 percent down? The answer to that question is yes, and often it makes more financial sense to do so. In fact, according to Freddie Mac, 40 percent of home buyers in today’s markets are making down payments of less than 10 percent. So if you are going to buy a primary residence home without saving the 20 percent, what are your options?

•     VA and USDA loans allow qualified borrowers to finance up to 100% of the
purchase price of a primary residence.

•     Freddie Mac and Fannie Mae have first time home buyer programs that allow up
to 97% financing.

•     FHA loans will finance up to 96.5% of the purchase price for a primary residence.

•     Conventional loans allow you to finance up to 95%.

•     Down payment assistance is another option to consider. These programs, which
are available through nonprofit organizations or government-run programs
(NCHFA is an example), give homeowners a hand in coming up with the down
payment they need to purchase the home.

•     Lenders are still offering piggyback loans. These loans allow you to take out a
smaller loan for part of your down payment, then a traditional loan for the rest of
the purchase price. You may still need about 5 percent of your own money to put
down on the purchase. Then you can work with your lender to borrow 15
percent with a smaller, and many times shorter-term loan, and the remainder with
a conventional mortgage.

While some of these home loans do have additional costs, like the funding fee for the VA loan or private mortgage insurance for conventional low down payment loans, they give you the ability to buy now without 20 percent down so you can start enjoying the benefits of home-ownership sooner.

The Bottom Line

Everyone’s financial situation is different. Getting sound financial advice is always wise. Whether you choose to put
down a large amount on your home or take advantage of these different loan options to buy with a smaller amount
down, make sure you weigh your options before making your choice.

Download pdf here

 

Eliminate These 5 Barriers To Saving For Your Down Payment This Month!

Saving Up: 5 Barriers to Saving Money That You Can Eliminate in Just One MonthWith all the expenses that go into monthly living and the temptations that come along with life, saving money for the down payment on your new home can be quite a struggle for many people. If you’re having a hard time saving and are wondering what you can do to ensure a higher bank balance next month, here are a few things that may pose a risk to getting the home of your dreams.

Forgetting To Take Lunch

One of the things most likely to defeat your bank balance is the daily office trip to the deli or diner. Instead of opting for an easy but expensive $10.00 lunch, take a few minutes at the end of each day to put together a sandwich or salad so you don’t have to spend extra funds on your lunch break.

Relying On Cable Television

With all the available options for streaming services, many people are switching out their packages for something a lot more economical. Cable can easily add up to $100.00 a month to your expenses, but a streaming service may only be a fraction of the cost and will provide savings you’ll soon notice.

Splurging On Morning Coffee

Grabbing the familiar cup of joe on the way to the office is certainly a way to ease yourself into the day, but one coffee can add up to a huge expense by the end of the month. If this is a vice you crave, try taking your own coffee to work and opt for a treat once a week if you really can’t resist.

Impulse Buys At The Grocery Store

Food certainly counts as a necessity, but there are many things that end up in the grocery cart at the end of a shopping trip that aren’t really staple items. If your cart is filling up with chips and chocolate, you might want to stick to your list or review your cart before the final purchase.

Avoiding Your Budget

Unless you’re taking to a spreadsheet to balance out your expenses and earnings, you may not see any significant savings at the end of each month. Budgeting will give you a better idea of what you can and can’t afford consistently, so make sure you’re writing everything down.

The idea of cutting back on spending is rarely a popular one, but there are things you can do every day that will make for a better bank balance at the end of the month. If you’re looking for more tips on buying your own home, contact your trusted mortgage professional today!

Will You Need Private Mortgage Insurance on Your Mortgage Loan?

Private Mortgage Insurance

 

Have you heard the term Private Mortgage Insurance (PMI) when looking to finance real estate?

You may be wondering what PMI is and how you know when you need to purchase it.

These answers can be hard to find among all the real estate jargon you might be hearing lately.

Below is the short version of what you need to know.

What is Private Mortgage Insurance?

Private Mortgage Insurance is an insurance premium required by some lenders to offset the risk of a borrower defaulting on their home loan.

When you put down less than 20 percent of the real estate’s purchase price, the lender will generally require that PMI is added to the loan.

It is usually added into the monthly mortgage payment until the equity position in the real estate reaches 20 percent. However, there may be other options available in your area.

Under the current law, PMI will be canceled automatically when you reach 22 percent equity in your home, if you are current on your payments.

If you aren’t current, the lender may not be required to cancel the mortgage insurance because the loan is considered high-risk.

After getting caught up on your payments, the PMI will likely be cancelled. Any money that you have overpaid must be refunded to you within 45 days.

What if Your Real Estate Increases in Value?

With a conventional loan, it may take as many as 15 years of a 30-year loan to pay your balance down 20 percent making the minimum monthly payment.

But, if property values in your area rise, you might be able to cancel the PMI sooner.

Some lenders may be willing to consider the new value of your home to determine the equity in your home.

You may, however, be responsible for any fees, like an appraisal, that are incurred to assess the new value of your property.

In the end, private mortgage insurance is likely a good option if you can’t afford a down payment of 20 percent of the purchase price.

Now May Be A Very Good Time To Take Action

With all of the activity happening the housing market, now may be the best time for you to purchase your new home. 

A smart next move would be speaking with a qualified home financing professional to learn which programs and down payment options are available in the Asheville area.