Pet-Friendly Homes: Some Selling Do’s and Dont’s

Nearly 70 million American households include at least one pet, but most prospective buyers won’t want to see evidence of pets in a home on the market.

Pet-Friendly Homes: Some Selling Do's and Dont'sNearly 70 million American households include at least one pet, but most prospective buyers won’t want to see evidence of pets in a home on the market.

Here are some tips about how to sell a pet-friendly home.

Prior To Listing

Point out special pet features to your real estate agent — a cat door, feeding station or a pet shower, even a fenced back yard or a dog run can be a bonus to many buyers. It’s important to remember that buyers want to imagine their pets in the home, not yours! Minimize your pet’s presence by decluttering pet supplies as well as your personal items.

While it is best to downplay non-human residents in a home for sale, some pets are more difficult to camoflage or move out of the way. If you have a bird, an aquarium, or large exotic pets, use your best judgment while keeping the “less is more” philosophy in mind.

If there is any pet damage, it should be repaired before you show the home. If necessary, repaint walls, refinish floors, or replace carpeting. Ask a friend or relative (one without a pet) to give your house a sniff test. If there are any odors, do whatever is necessary to eliminate them. It is not likely enough to try to mask the odors with air freshners in order to make the best impression on potential buyers.

Dealing With Showings

Always arrange for animals to be out of the house when a showing is scheduled. If you can’t be there to pick up a pet, trust a neighbor to take the dog for a walk or herd the cat into a carrier and keep it for a few hours. A barking dog in the back yard is annoying, and even the cutest puppy can intimidate a buyer. Cats, too, are notoriously independent, and not all humans are cat-lovers.

Buyers expect even a house with pets to be kept scrupulously clean. Sweep and vacuum up pet hair as often as necessary. Pick up feeding bowls and toys, and remove cat litter boxes prior to a showing. Polish nose prints off glass and put away the scratching pole. Think of pets and pet items the same as you would personal photographs and other memorbillia that clutters your home. Removing those items helps the buyer see themselves in your home and can increase the likelihood of a sale.

It’s also wise to double check with your insurance company to determine your liability in the event that your pet bites or otherwise injures anyone at your property. 

Before And During Moving

Remember that moving is stressful, not only for you, but for your best friend as well. Speak to your veterinarian in advance about possible symptoms of anxiety such as increased accidents, changes in appetite, aggressive behavior or other personality changes that may occur. If you notice any significant signs of anxiety, seek treatment.

If at all possible, take your pet to see your new home prior to your move. If not, continue to look for signs that your pet is feeling disoriented or anxious. Finding a reliable and trustworthy veternarian near your new home beforehand is a good idea in case your pet is struggling. Take extra care that your pet doesn’t try to “escape” back to the familiar and get lost. 

Selling your home and moving into a new home can be exciting, complicated and stressful events. The same can be true for your pets. With a little bit of extra planning, things can go a lot smoother for your entire family. Contact your real estate professional for even more tips for a successful home selling, home buying and relocating experience.

 

After the Sale: The Next Steps and What You’ll Need to Do Before You Move Out

Getting an offer on your home can certainly make it feel like the hard part is over, but even after the deal is sealed there’s still a lot to do when it comes to moving out. Whether you’re getting prepared for a future move or your buyer has just signed on the dotted line, here are the first steps to take once it’s certain your property is off the market.

After the Sale: The Next Steps and What You'll Need to Do Before You Move OutGetting an offer on your home can certainly make it feel like the hard part is over, but even after the deal is sealed there’s still a lot to do when it comes to moving out. Whether you’re getting prepared for a future move or your buyer has just signed on the dotted line, here are the first steps to take once it’s certain your property is off the market.

Start The Packing

For many people, packing is something they would rather put off until the last minute, but boxing up your stuff is actually a great opportunity for a little spring-cleaning at any time of the year. Instead of procrastinating, get started early and ensure that you’re only packing up the items you will make use of. Whether you decide to pass the extras off to friends or donate them, this is a great way to make your next home clutter free.

Book The Moving Trucks

The day you have to be out of your home by will be set in stone, so it’s important to get ahead of this process and contact the movers as soon as you can. Moving companies have busier times of year and by booking in advance, you won’t have to comply with their loaded schedule. While you’ll want to make a reservation if you’re working under a time crunch, it still might be worth shopping around to see if you can find a better deal.

Complete The Last Minute Fix-Ups

In all likelihood, there’s a list of minor tasks the homebuyer will want you to complete prior to move-in. It’s important to prioritize these things so they’re not left until the last minute, so ensure you make a list and pick a day or a certain window of time to complete them. Whether you’ve agreed to paint a room or get the windows re-sealed, not making these fixes can end up costing you money so it will be worth the time you spend.

It’s a wonderful feeling to get your home off the market at the purchase price you were looking for, but there are still things that need to be done before the deal is sealed. By making a list of any outstanding maintenance and booking the moving trucks, you’ll be well on your way to your new home.

Moving with Children? Here’s How to Quickly Assess Whether a Community Is Family Friendly

If you’re looking for a home that’s in a family-friendly neighborhood, there are a few key things you can look for to make sure your new house is a good fit for both you and your children.

Moving with Children? Here's How to Quickly Assess Whether a Community Is Family FriendlyIf you’re looking for a home that’s in a family-friendly neighborhood, there are a few key things you can look for to make sure your new house is a good fit for both you and your children.

Quality Public or Private Schools

Are there good public schools nearby? If so, do they span from kindergarten all the way to high school? Finding a home in an area with a great elementary school can be a good fit for several years, but if you’re looking for a home that will be convenient in the long-term it’s important to consider your proximity to both primary and secondary schools.

Parks And Other Relaxing Green Spaces

If you’re looking for a family-friendly neighborhood with free sources of entertainment, make sure that there is at least one park or playground nearby. Playgrounds can provide endless amusement for younger children, whereas a park can offer entertainment for kids of any age. Either way, have a park in the area will help boost the quality of your family’s leisure time.

Recreation Facilities And Other Amenities

For even more great leisure opportunities, check out the local recreational facilities. Public swimming pools, community centers, and recreation centers often offer a wide variety extracurricular activities and programs. These can be a great support when it comes to supplementing what your kids’ education with skills that are learned outside of school, and can encourage a healthy lifestyle as well.

Shopping & Services

If you’re looking for a convenient lifestyle, perhaps one of the most important factors to consider is what stores and businesses are located nearby. Is there a grocery store, doctor’s office, cafe, drug store, gas station, or other essential businesses nearby? Make your life easy! If there are stores nearby that meet your needs it will help boost your neighborhood satisfaction for years to come.

A Short (Or At Least Tolerable) Commute

If you commute to work, it is also valuable to consider how long of a drive it is between your place of employment and potential new home. The less time you have to spend on the road, the more time you’ll have with your family.

Neighbors You Will Enjoy Associating With

Finally, it is important to consider who else lives in the area. Is the neighborhood you’re looking at full of other young families? Are there other children for your kids to play with? Does it seem like a close-knit community?

Although you can’t predict how relationships will blossom in a new home, you’ll set yourself up for success if there are people with similar interests and lifestyles as you. If the people seem great, chances are the neighborhood is, too!

Ready to purchase the perfect home to raise your family in? Contact your trusted mortgage professional today.

3 Stress-Free Packing Tips For Moving Into Your New Home

Moving everything in your house to your new home can be an overwhelming task.

Packing Tips For Moving HomesMoving everything in your house to your new |**CITY & CITY**| home can be an overwhelming task.

You never realize how much stuff you actually own until you try to fit it all into boxes and move it somewhere new.

When you are packing up your things to relocate, here are some helpful tips to make your moving experience much easier:

Start Packing In Advance

You don’t have to wait until the day before you move to start packing everything in your house!

As soon as you find out that you are moving, you can start packing the items you don’t often use, such as your seasonal decorations, photo albums and family keepsakes.

If you pack a few items per week, you’ll have almost everything packed by the time you are ready to go except for the essentials you use every day.

Establish A System

Rather than randomly throwing every item you see into a box, think ahead and create a logical plan for your packing.

Before you start, develop a simple record-keeping system.

Give every box you pack a number and write a corresponding list detailing the items in that box.

This way, when you arrive you will know exactly where to find each item.

Stay Organized

You will want to keep all of the items from each area of the house together so they can be unpacked easily.

For example, keep all of the boxes of kitchen supplies together and then put them straight into the kitchen when you arrive at your new home.

You could even designate a color for each room in the house and put colored stickers on the boxes so that the movers or anyone helping you can easily determine in which room a box belongs.

Bonus Tip: Sometimes Less Is More

One final consideration that can make your move easier is to use your move as an opportunity to pare down your unused belongings.

Plus, you won’t be left wondering why you decided to move things from one home to another once you start unpacking.

As with many things, the more organized you are when packing, the less stressful it will be when you arrive and at your new house. 

 

Help Your Pets Adjust To Your New Home

Tips to ease your pets’ transition to a new home

Help pets adjust to a new homeMoving to a new home can be a difficult transition for everyone in the family, including the furry, four-legged members.

Dogs and cats develop a strong bond with their environment so when they are relocated from their territory it can cause them stress.

Here are some tips to ease your pets’ transition to a new home :

Keep Your Mood Calm
Pets are very tuned-in to your emotions and will sense your mood. If you are stressed throughout the moving process, your cat or dog will pick up on this and it will make him anxious. Try to remain calm and give your pet plenty of attention and reassurance during the process of moving.

Transporting Your Pet
A few weeks before the move, introduce your pet to his pet carrier so that he becomes familiar with it. It will be much less scary for him to be transported in a carrier, which already has recognizable smells and perhaps a favorite chew toy or blanket inside. When you are moving your pets to your new home, it is a good idea not to feed them for about three hours before setting off, as this can help to prevent accidents while in transit.

Upon Arrival
When you get to your new residence, place your pets in one room of the house and provide them with water, food, and a few familiar possessions. Keep them in a closed room while you move things in, as the process of moving boxes and furniture can be chaotic and doors can be left open. Once everything has been moved in, you can take the time to give your pet some one-on-one attention.

Dogs find routines comforting, so try to stick to the same schedule of feeding and walking in your new home. Cats will want to explore and rub their scent all over the house to claim it as their territory. A cat might attempt to return to its old home after a move, so keep it indoors for a few weeks at first.

These are just a few ways that you can make moving to a new home a better experience for your beloved pets. If you’d like more suggestions for helping your pets and family adjust to a move, call or email me with your questions.

Before Moving, Check Your New Cost Of Living Estimates

Before moving to a new state, or even long distances intra-state, check your new home town’s Cost of Living. It will help you plan a better housing budget.

Cost of Living adjustments in a new townWith home values slow to rise and mortgage rates at all-time lows, there’s never been a more affordable time to own a home.

However, there is more to the cost of living than just a mortgage payment. There’s the cost of groceries, gasoline and routine medical care, too.

Not surprisingly, where we live affects our costs.

Big cities are often more expensive in which to live, for example, and local tax laws influence daily costs, too. 

For home buyers moving across state borders, therefore — or even for those moving long distances intra-state — it’s important to know the relative costs in your new hometown as compared to your current one. Your household cash flow depends on it. You can’t know your budget for a home if you don’t know what life in a new town will cost you.

Enter Bankrate.com’s Cost of Living Comparison Calculator.

In comparing the costs of 60 mundane, everyday items, the Cost of Living Comparison calculator can show you how common costs in your current home town compare to costs in your soon-to-be new home town.

The calculator asks for just three inputs — (1) In what city do you live now, (2) To what city are you moving, and (3) What is your current salary — then uses that information to produce a detailed cost comparison.

Some of the Cost of Living items compared include :

  • Ground beef costs
  • Veterinary services costs
  • Dozen egg costs
  • Doctor visit costs
  • Hair care costs

The calculator also includes local mortgage rate differences to help plan for housing, and accounts for median home prices, too.

The online Cost of Living calculator is based on data from the ACCRA. On the ACCRA website, a similar cost comparison report sells for $5. At Bankrate.com, you can get the data for free.

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