Is A Reverse Mortgage Right For You?

Is A Reverse Mortgage Right For YouImagine the bank depositing monthly premiums into your account instead of you writing a mortgage check. That’s basically how a reverse mortgage works.  

Traditional mortgages involve people paying down the interest and principal on a home loan. The goal is generally to pay off the property and cruise through retirement without that monthly installment eating at your budget. With your home paid off, those previously allotted finances can be used to relax and enjoy your retirement to the fullest. That’s the best-case scenario anyway.

But financial life has changed significantly over the past half-century. The formula for economic security has been chipped away by rising health care costs, tax increases, and other complications. Working hard and paying off your family home may no longer equal financial flexibility later in life. The valued elders in everyday American communities may require enhanced resources and the reverse mortgage has been a viable option for many.

How A Reverse Mortgage Works

The product was created to allow homeowners who are 62 and older to convert their home equity into cash payments. Rather than you paying the bank, the roles are reversed and the lender basically buys out your equity by paying you in monthly installments.  

Homeowners are required to stay up to date on things such as local property taxes, association fees and insurance. The lender receives reimbursement for the equity purchase when the home sells at the conclusion of the agreement. What was once money going out each much makes a full swing to cash coming into the home. That can be a remarkable financial boon.

Types Of Reverse Mortgages

The reverse mortgage products on the market can be broken down into three basic types. The overwhelming majority are federally-insured home equity conversion mortgages.

Industry insiders often refer to these products as HECMs and they are supported by the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development. They reportedly comprise upwards of 90 percent of reverse mortgages. Other types include private loans and those with a single purpose. For example, a qualified homeowner may secure a reverse mortgage to make a necessary home improvement. State agencies and nonprofits often back these to help low-income families through adversity.

Benefits Of A Reverse Mortgage

When people discover that their pension, 401(k) and savings won’t necessarily carry them through a comfortable retirement, selling the family home and downsizing emerges as one of the solutions. But reverse mortgages can offer an alternative by providing the following benefits.

  • Steady Home Life: Reverse mortgages allow homeowners to stay in their home and receive payments on the equity rather than sell, move and squirrel away the profit. The key benefit is remaining in the family home that is rich with memories.
  • Relieve Burden: The increased costs of taxes, insurance, utilities and other living expenses may eat away at the financial relief gained by paying off a home. Reverse mortgages infuse elders’ budgets and help overcome financial shortfalls.
  • Eliminate Mortgage: For those who still have a monthly mortgage payment, a reverse mortgage can pay off the outstanding balance. The product allows homeowners to subtract money owed and still receive monthly installments. That can be a substantial financial swing.

Reverse mortgages can be an excellent tool to improve your quality of life during retirement. However, it’s important to have a realistic long-term financial plan in place.

If you are considering a reverse mortgage, speak with an experienced mortgage professional about options that best meet your needs.

Pros and Cons of Downsizing After Retirement

Pros and Cons of Downsizing After RetirementWith Baby Boomers already rolling into retirement and Gen X looking forward to shrugging off the stress of the 40-hour work week, downsizing could be a strategic move.

For many Americans, homeownership remains their single largest investment and the monthly mortgage payment their highest bill. Lowering or nixing that cost altogether can free up a considerable amount of cash that could be used for retirement security or leisure activities. Keep in mind, your “golden years” should be just that, so enjoy them.

That being said, there are pros and cons to consider when deciding whether to downsize to a less expensive home.

Size Matters

If you have raised a family and find yourself as an empty-nester, so to speak, you probably have more home than you needed during the days of romping youngsters. Downsizing to a smaller home reduces the amount of maintenance, upkeep and cleaning responsibilities. Relieving yourself of those chores can free up time to relax.

On the con side, a smaller home means less space to for family visits. Although children and grandchildren may not spend months at a time, having the space for holiday stayovers can be important. A smart downsizing plan should consider balancing reduced labor with family time.

Costs Considerations

The surface numbers of downsizing often point to freeing up personal income. A lower or no mortgage payment equals more cash on hand. But selling and buying come with industry and relocation costs.

In all likelihood, your home sale and purchase will come with real estate agent fees, closing and moving costs among others. It’s important to factor all of these expenses into your future projections.

Although home transaction costs are generally static in the real estate industry, relocation can be a bit of a wild card. In-state moves may require only a set fee from a local moving outfit. But if you are headed to warmer or cooler climates, a big move can run upwards of 10 percent of your selling price. Get solid moving prices before tallying up your gains.

Ranked among the top pros to downsizing is the reduction in expenses. Retirement-age folks who have built up significant home equity may find themselves in a position to finally have no more mortgage. In this low-inventory seller’s market, the ability to cash out on high equity gives Baby Boomers and Gen Xers a chance at a zero-mortgage lifestyle.   

Many of our valued elders and 50-somethings are in the downsizing driver’s seat. Contact your trusted mortgage professional to discuss home equity options and other financing programs that can accomodate a retiree’s fixed income.

Your Guide To Aging In Place Home Modifications

Your Guide To Aging in Place Home ModificationsIf you’ve had to watch your parents transition into assisted living, you may have no desire to call such a place home. You are not alone. According to the Aging in Place Housing Survey conducted by the American Association of Retired Persons (AARP), more than 90 percent of seniors want to remain in their home.

Many survey respondents said that they would rather use nursing home funds towards purchasing a home that is suited for aging in place or making accessible home modifications.  

You’ve probably heard the buzzwords — aging in place, non-assisted living, universal design — these phrases mean the same thing: growing older in your home. Today, home modifications can help you continue to live in your home as you age. Plus, aging-in-place home modifications are much less expensive than moving into a nursing home or assisted living facility.

The problem is that most existing homes are not conducive to aging in place. There are more than 100 million homes in the United States. However, only one percent of them are currently set up for accessibility. Fortunately, there are a variety of home modifications that you can do to make any home more accessible. Here is a handy guide to accessible home modifications.

Think About Your Future Needs

The first step in making sure your home is suited to aging in place is to consider how your needs might change in the future. Everyone’s situation is different.

If you have a chronic illness, such as diabetes or heart disease, it is best to talk with your doctor to determine how these health issues might make it hard for you to live on your own in the future. Consider what modifications you’ll need to make to ensure that your home will suit your future needs.

For example, if you are thinking of buying a new home with an upstairs, you might use the upper part of the house for your home office now and convert the area into caregiver’s quarters in the future.

Consider a First-Floor Master Suite

An essential home modification for aging in place is first-floor living. Although you might not have mobility issues now, hip replacements and other problems that affect mobility are frequent with increasing age.

Plus, a first-floor suite can increase the value of your home should you sell in the future. According to data from Builder Online, out of the best-selling new home floor plans, more than 83 percent feature accessible master suites.

Choose Slip-Resistant Flooring

Falls are a serious threat to the independence and health of older adults. They are the leading cause of injuries among Americans ages 65 and older. That is why it is so important to take steps to reduce the likelihood of a fall.

One of the easiest modifications that you can make in this area is to choose slip-resistant flooring. Cork and bamboo flooring are both popular for aging in place as they are softer and thus more forgiving during a fall.

These are just a few of the aging in place modifications that you can make to your home. There are many others. The important thing to remember is that you don’t have to sacrifice lifestyle or luxury to have a home that is also accessible.

Many of the above modifications can be made anytime and can help enhance the beauty and comfort of your home. As you plan for your future in your home, please contact your mortgage professional to explore finance options for these and other necessary home modifications.

 

Nearing Retirement? Three Reasons Why You Might Consider a ‘Reverse Mortgage’

Nearing Retirement? Three Reasons Why You Might Consider a 'Reverse Mortgage'If you are nearing retirement, a reverse mortgage might be right for you. This type of mortgage essentially allows you to turn your home equity into cash. If you find yourself with little money, a reverse mortgage could be the perfect solution, and here’s why.

No Worries About Monthly Payments

After taking on a mortgage, there are many costs that you have to worry about. One of these problems is mortgage insurance premiums. Add interest and fees from lender service providers to the mix, and you’ve got yourself many costs.

All of these fees can create tremendous headaches, as a large chunk of the loan amount goes into covering these costs.

When you undertake a reverse mortgage, you don’t have to worry about any of that. The loan is paid back with home equity, not ongoing cash flow, so monthly payments aren’t a worry.

Your Income Won’t Affect Your Eligibility, And The Income You’ll Get Won’t Create Problems

If the reason you’re hoping to get a reverse mortgage is your low income, the last thing you want is that income to be the deciding factor. With this type of loan, it’s not an issue. That’s because the thing that determines eligibility is your house’s value.

In fact, the income you’ll be getting from this loan is not taxable, which means you’ll be able to keep it in full. Plus, any benefits you get from Medicare will not be affected, and neither will your Social Security.

As such, what you’ll be getting is a loan that doesn’t take into account your current income. Rather, it adds on to it, without creating any issues for you. Plus, you’ll be able to get the money in several different ways, which means you’re in control.

Lastly, the money you get is fully yours. That means that you can use it for anything you want, whether that means you’ll be paying off other loans, or simply funding your day-to-day needs.

You Won’t Be Taken Away From Your Home

Your house is yours because it feels that way. It’s the place in which you’ve invested money and effort. It’s also the place where many loved memories were created, and where they’ll keep on being created.

One of the hardest things for the elderly is being removed from their loved homes and placed into care. They have to leave the place they’ve grown to love. Worse than that, they’re thrown into a world they don’t know.

With a reverse mortgage, this doesn’t need to happen. With this type of loan, you get additional income, and you get to stay in your own house.

Not only that, but you’re also keeping the title to that place until you move, pass away, or reach the end of the loan’s term. Your home will stay yours, both effectively and in the documents.

There are many more reasons why a reverse mortgage is a great idea. However, the fact that you’re in complete control of the income you’ll be getting is one of the most important things.

If you’d like to learn more about reverse mortgages, be sure to contact your mortgage professional.